All posts in Ozone as an Oxidant and Antioxidant Levels

Ozone Oxidant Antioxidant

Ozone oxidant antioxidant

Ozone Oxidant Antioxidant

Ozone as an oxidant and its influence on free radical activity and antioxidant levels in the human environment in disease and health

 Thomas Marshall-Manifold
Wimbledon Clinic of Natural Medicine, London, UK.

Abstract

A  number  of  free  radical  species  fulfill  physiologically  important  roles within the body, for example, superoxide and nitric oxide function as second messengers. However, free radical levels in the body must be carefully controlled as they are highly reactive    and can cause tissue destruction.

Antioxidants help regulate and control the levels of free radicals at the required  physiological  concentrations.  When  the  production  of  free radicals  and  their  removal  by  the  antioxidant  system  becomes unbalanced, tissue damage and disease can occur.

The use of ozone as a therapeutic modality to counteract the disease process in the body would seem to be paradoxical at the least, ozone being an oxidant, and by definition a procurer of free radical activity. This  paper  reports  the  effect  of  ozone  on  both  free  radical  and antioxidant levels in the blood of subjects both in disease and health before, during, and after ozone therapy.

Introduction

Extensive research in the field of free radicals and ROS has linked them with a wide range of  chronic  and acute  diseases.    Some  of the major diseases have  been discussed in this brochure, however the list is growing daily and includes other diseases such as HIV, genetic mutations, motor neurone disease, hypocuprosis, adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).

A number of free radical species fulfil physiologically-important roles within the body, for example, superoxide and nitric oxide function as second messengers. However, free radical levels in the body must be carefully controlled as they are highly reactive and can cause tissue destruction. Antioxidants help regulate and control the levels of free radicals at the required physiological concentrations. When the production of free radicals and their removal by the antioxidant system  becomes unbalanced, tissue damage and disease can occur.

1:   Primary health care screening – to detect and identify individuals with lowered antioxidants  defences  who  may  be  at  greater  risk  of  developing  ROS-induced disease. People identified as being “at risk” could be targeted for intervention before presentation of overt disease, thus reducing healthcare costs. Recent studies have demonstrated that individuals with a family history of  heart  disease,  but  without obvious  disease  themselves,  have  lowered  antioxidant  defences  compared  to individuals with no family history of heart disease.

2:   Diagnostic monitoring – of diseased patients for the assessment of antioxidant levels.  This  assists  the  clinician  in  determining  optimal  treatment  and  possible outcome.   Reduction in antioxidant defences has been correlated with poor outcome in acute myocardial infarction.

Read full document ozone oxidant antioxidant here.

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